Yardbird was created with the intention of becoming a neighborhood staple, focusing on quality food and service. While the food, beverage, and service elements align to create the izakaya-like atmosphere, the design of the restaurant is the cherry on top of the entire Yardbird experience. In partnership with furniture designer Sean Dix, Chef Matt Abergel worked to create an honest, no frills environment – clean and minimal with industrial details.

To create the modern izakaya, Abergel and Dix concentrated on taking away the superfluous and leaving only what was necessary for the restaurant. Space is at a minimum in Hong Kong, so it was important to ensure that every feature had a function and purpose. The front facade has floor to ceiling windows, which not only lets in strong natural light, it also allows passersby to witness the hustle and bustle of service. The materials used to build Yardbird include wood, metal, and stainless steel.

Yardbird features a standing bar on the ground floor where guests are encouraged to drink and eat while they wait for a table. There’s also a stainless steel L-shaped bar, with custom furniture by Dix, with the best views of the bartenders at work. In the basement, where the kitchen is located, a custom Kama Asa grill from Tokyo was installed for all of the yakitori. The walls are mostly left bare with a few pieces from artist Evan Hecox (who also designed the Yardbird logo), local artist Prodip Leung, and an original Christian Hosoi skateboard deck from the legend himself.

Images Courtesy Carmen Chan

3 thoughts on “A Look into the Design of Yardbird on Bridges Street

  1. […] The meaning of ronin is a samurai with no master. And while there is a method behind the madness of RŌNIN, this was the inspiration behind the restaurant – it would become a place where Chef Matt Abergel could test his creativity and cook with more freedom and variety. This is the second restaurant designed together with Sean Dix. […]

  2. […] collaboration with Hecox, the Yardbird chicken logo and wordmark were created. The wordmark uses the unmistakable Evan Hecox handwriting […]

  3. […] Yardbird‘s current tare sauce still contains traces of the original tare that was created when the restaurant first opened. To add a depth of flavor, roasted chicken carcasses and Tokyo onion tops are added to each new batch that is simmered weekly. Not every yakitori skewer is seasoned with tare, but the ones that are (including the meatball, thigh, and rib) are first lightly grilled to develop some color, then dipped into the tare sauce throughout the cooking process. […]

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