An onsen egg, or “onsen tamago” in Japan, is a traditional Japanese egg cooked at a low temperature. Unlike your typical soft-boiled egg, an onsen egg has a deliciously unique texture – the yolk is firm yet retains the color and creamy consistency of a runny yolk and the white is soft and milky. This happens because the egg yolk and the egg white solidify at different temperatures.

Onsen eggs are often served in a dashi-based soy sauce as a part of a traditional Japanese breakfast. They can also be enjoyed on top of steamed rice or noodles. But really, what doesn’t taste better with an egg on top?

Onsen eggs were originally slow-cooked in hot springs in Japan, hence the name. Technology has obviously advanced since then and you can now easily make onsen eggs in the comfort of your own home. We asked the Yardbird Chefs their #ProTips on how to make the perfect onsen egg, with or without a sous-vide machine. The best part is because they’re cooked at such a low temperature, the cooking time is much more forgiving compared to other styles of eggs. The YB Chefs recommend an hour but a few minutes more or less won’t make a drastic difference.

If you have a sous-vide machine or immersion circulator like Anova or Nomiku, onsen eggs are dead simple.

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Onsen Eggs with a Sous Vide Machine:

  • Take the eggs out of the fridge about one hour before cooking to let them come to room temperature
  • Gently place eggs (with shells intact) in the sous-vide machine
  • Set machine to 62.5 degrees Celsius
  • Remove after one hour
  • Crack gently and serve immediately

No sous-vide machine at home? No problem! All you need is a stove, pot, and a good kitchen thermometer.

Onsen Eggs with a Kitchen Thermometer:

  • Take the eggs out of the fridge about one hour before cooking to let them come to room temperature
  • Fill the pot with water and bring to a simmer
  • Check the temperature with the thermometer and adjust the heat so that the temperature stays around 62 degrees Celsius
  • Gently place eggs (with shells intact) into the pot
  • Continue to monitor the temperature for the next hour to make sure it stays around 62 degrees Celsius
  • Remove after one hour
  • Crack gently and serve immediately

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